Busty Girl Problems: Blooming Early and Beating Shame

Today I’m sharing a story from my friend Trisha. Since some of you commented to this post about women increasing their bust size that “big boobs aren’t all they’re cracked up to be” I knew Trisha’s story would be of interest.  But, even if you are like me and never had a problem with your cups being “too full,” I think you’ll still be encouraged by her story of overcoming shame.


Some say there are “perks” to having large breasts. I’ve counted exactly two: excellent buoyancy and easy employment.

Any busty girl will tell you she can float for days because of the built-in flotation devices. And it’s nice to know the good people of Hooters will always employ the well-endowed.

But as a girl who “blossomed” almost overnight, I didn’t see any benefits.

Fifth grade had just started and I sat in the back of our muddy Dodge Dynasty, a car in desperate need of shocks, when my mom announced to the family that I had graduated out of training bras and into a C cup.

Riding in a car without shocks would never be the same. And the ta-ta’s kept growing.

It wasn’t long before my mom delivered me to my busty grandma to ask for help. “I just don’t know how to support them,” my mom said, gesturing to my chest as if monsters lurked under my shirt.

My 75-year old grandma took me shopping and introduced me to her favorite, cone-shaped Playtex bras. I shudder to think I spent my formative years with triangular-shaped boobs just like grandma.

I began to covet my friends’ flat chests as we would run drills at basketball practice. Sports bras were a joke. I knew a softball player who duck taped her breasts in an effort to keep them from flopping in her face as she rounded the bases. I’ve always wanted to try that.

No I didn’t see any perks. I had the blood-red stretch marks and leering glances from older men to prove it. Instead I saw shame and body loathing.

Almost overnight I went from the body of a 10-year old child to a curvy adult physique. I was getting attention from older guys. I felt the stares from strangers everywhere I went.bra image

“I thought you were 16 or 17?” they asked. “I’m only 11,” I said. I learned to emphasize my age to anyone I met so they wouldn’t question me.

The enemy planted seeds of shame in my heart. He told me I was different, an outcast. So I withdrew. I stopped talking at school and shunned the limelight.

Mix that with the over-zealous modesty message I heard at church, and you have a recipe for a real body image battle. Not only was I embarrassed at my core, I felt dirty. Church led me to further discontentment with my body.

I thought God had made a mistake in forming my body. Maybe He had made a mistake making me.

I carried this baggage into my marriage. For years, I never felt beautiful. I thought my husband would say nice things to be polite. I didn’t believe I was lovable.

It wasn’t until I fully submitted my life to God that I began to notice a change.

The more I placed God at the center of my life, the less I worried about myself. As God-consciousness grew, self-consciousness waned.

It was only in total submission and worship that I saw Jesus for who He really is: Love. Unabashed love stared back at me as I beheld Him daily in prayer and His Word. The more I allowed His beauty to peer back at—into me—the more I began to see His beauty shining out of me when I looked in the mirror.

All I can say is grace came.

Grace always comes. God has warred on my behalf in the realm of insecurities and personal worth. I can tell you that God doesn’t stop fighting for you. He is right there with you in the trenches of whatever battle you face.

The LORD himself goes before you and will be with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged. (Deuteronomy 31:8 NIV).

God also loved me well through my husband Michael. Many times God has used his arms to hug me.

I once thought my bulges offended my husband’s eyes the same way they offended mine. But his persistent love won out in the end. Love always wins, doesn’t it?

Through God’s grace and my husband’s patient affection, I truly believe I am beautiful, all my lady lumps included.

What about you? Have you battled shame or unworthiness because of some aspect of your body? How are you learning to over come it?

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Trisha Mugo is an award-wining writer, grace-dependent youth pastor and wife of a Kenyan warrior. When she’s not blogging or taking care of three kids, she’s cooking, reading or contemplating life. She loves learning, Chicago-style pizza and meeting like-minded friends at her blog, www.TrishaMugo.com.

3 Comments
  • Jeril
    August 30, 2014

    Nice writeup.. Keep it up Trisha

    • Jeril
      August 31, 2014

      I am very happy that you found the right way to address this busty issue by approaching God.

      Here in India the situation is bit grave for girls with heavy bosom. Men tend to stare so much at their part and even many churches dont address this issue correctly.

      • Trisha Mugo
        September 2, 2014

        Thanks Jeril. That does sound uncomfortable! I’m sorry to hear churches aren’t much help. My heart goes out to these women. Shame can be so pervasive, but thankfully we don’t have to have shame. I love Psalm 34:5. “Those who look to him are radiant; their faces are never covered with shame.”

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